Previously at the ICA - Events

Oleg Kulik, Armadillo For Your Show (during the opening of Live Culture), Tate Modern, London, 2003. Courtesy the artist

Oleg Kulik

21 Nov 2014

Ukrainian-born Russian performance artist, sculptor and curator discusses his extensive work and practice with London-based curator Paul Pieroni. Oleg Kulik came to prominence shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union, with his provocative performances offering an alternative and critical social commentary. Kulik is most renowned for his performances as a dog, including Mad Dog, Reservoir Dog and I Bite America and America Bites Me. In recent years he has pursued new subjects of focus such as the relationship between religion and art.
Oleg Kulik was born in Kiev, 1961 and lives and works in Moscow. He graduated from Kiev Art School in 1979, then Kiev Geological Survey College in 1982 and was awarded a Berlin scholarship by the Berlin Senate in 1996. Kulik has exhibited in various group and solo shows internationally including Deep into Russia, Galleria Pack, Milan (2010), New Sermon, Photos and Videos of Performances 1993–2003, Rabouan-Moussion Gallery, Paris (2008), Oleg Kulik, Chronicle 1987-2007, retrospective exhibition, Central House of Artist, Moscow (2007), Russia Performing Bodies, Tate Modern, London (2000). He has also performed internationally at galleries such as Muzej Suvremene Umjetnosti , Zagreb,  Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin and Tate Modern, London.
Paul Pieroni is Exhibitions Curator at SPACE, London, where he runs an acclaimed programme of exhibitions and events. In recent years SPACE has presented UK debut solo exhibitions by Aleksandra Domanović, Marlie Mul and Max Brand as well as survey projects exploring the work of Jo Spence, Raymond Pettibon, Bernadette Corporation and Paul McCarthy. Pieroni is a regular visiting lecturer at Goldsmiths and The Royal College of Art and writes for a number of publications, including frieze and Art Review.

Supported by The Tsukanov Family Foundation

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E.g., 2016-10-24