Previously at the ICA - Films

Stanley Kubrick, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, 1964

Rudolph Herzog presents Dr. Strangelove

8 Jun 2013

In his new book A Short History of Nuclear Folly, Rudolph Herzog, the acclaimed author of Dead Funny, presents a devastating account of history's most irresponsible uses of nuclear technology. From the nightmare of Broken Arrows to Nazi bombs, suicide dust to plummeting nuclear satellites - and the death of John Wayne - Herzog focuses in on long-forgotten nuclear projects that nearly led to disaster.

A Short History of Nuclear Folly is a blackly sardonic people’s history of atomic blunders and near-misses in the spirit of films such as Dr. Strangelove and The Atomic Café. So it's only fitting that this celebrated young historian will introduce the book before a screening of Kubrick's Dr Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

Rudolph Herzog is the author of the hugely popular Dead Funny: Telling Jokes in Hitler’s Germany (Melville House, 2011) and, as a director, is best known for the reality crime series The Heist (Channel 4). He is the son of the celebrated filmmaker Werner Herzog.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, dir. Stanley Kubrick, USA 1964, 95 mins, cert. PG

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